Six workplace predictions for 2015

Freelance and social media, workplace predictions for 2015

Social thinker Michael McQueen says workers will be more mobile, and Gen Y could strike hiccups as they take a seat in the manager's chair

Social thinker Michael McQueen says workers will be even more mobile, and Gen Y could strike hiccups as they take a seat in the manager’s chair.
 
“Third space” working environments will become the norm
Working from home is still on the rise, as people [and their employers] grow more comfortable using technology to hook into work systems. But working from “third space locations” is also on the rise, for many of the same reasons. In Germany, for example, business services provider Regus has launched business lounges at Shell petrol stations so mobile workers can conduct meetings, access printing and internet facilities, and mail and collect packages while on the road.

The revolving door is back
Social researcher Michael McQueen says that a staggering 86 per cent of employees are already looking for work outside their current occupations and nearly one-third expect workers to job-hop. The only thing companies can do to increase retention rates is to create a superior work culture in which staff have friends, are engaged in their work and get perks. 

More Gen Ys are running the show
A study by CareerBuilder found that 38 per cent of the workforce is managed by Gen Y and it’s already caused a few problems. McQueen says these new managers are often under-prepared and over-confident: they were never trained to be good leaders, are being pushed into leadership roles out of necessity, and are causing older workers to leave.
Still, with “owner” being the fifth most popular job title for entrepreneurial-minded Gen Ys, companies need to allow them to operate that way by giving them control over their time, activities and budgets as much as possible.

“A staggering 86 per cent of employees are already looking for work outside their current occupations.”

New kids on the block
Just as Gen Ys move into the corner office, the first of their younger cousins are entering the workforce. Gen Zs (born 1999–2012) are even more tech-savvy and empowered than Gen Ys at the same age, but can lack resilience. 

Social media on the job
Some 58 per cent of people are more likely to want to work at a company that is using social media, and more than 20 per cent are more likely to stay if the company uses social media. People want to work for interesting companies and social media posts give them a better sense of what organisations are about than corporate websites.

The freelance economy
Being a temporary worker or consultant is being seen as more legitimate, due in part to the new access delivered by technology. A study by Elance-oDesk shows that 30 per cent of Australians undertake some form of flexible freelance work. The number could rise to 50 per cent by 2020 if it follows US trends.

This article is from the March 2015 issue of INTHEBLACK.


March 2015
March 2015

Read the March issue

Each month we select the must-reads from the current issue of INTHEBLACK. Read more now. 

Table of Contents