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Thea O'Connor

Thea O'Connor is a health journalist, presenter and health coach. She has more than 20 years’ experience in the health sector including her background as a dietician, and workplace health consultant. Thea is also founder of NapNow and a committed "naptivist" - taking a (horizontal) stand for normalising the power nap in our work culture.

The average office worker today is standing less than at any other point in human history.

The truth behind the standing-up-at-work movement


Developing a better BQ is useful in helping people forge a closer, more responsive relationship with their bodies.

10 ways body intelligence can improve your work performance


70 per cent of US offices have some type of open-plan design and Australian organisations are increasingly following suit.

Open-plan offices: how to make them work


In the last few decades, mentoring has become more formalised and recognised as a valuable form of professional development.

How to make mentoring work and why your workplace will benefit


When parents talk about how excited they are to be able to pick up the kids at the end of the day, and earn a full-time wage, that’s life-changing stuff.

Can a shorter workday work?


Accountants are more likely to come across potential rather than actual abuse, says Stephen Jones CPA.

Rising house prices are fuelling elder financial abuse: how accountants can help


Elliot Costello urges accountants to listen to their own hunger and desire to bring about change and to have the courage to respond.

Innovative approaches to social change


What are the challenges that organisations are facing as they try to progress from diversity to inclusion? Illustrations by Jessica Meyrick

Making diversity work in the workplace


Do you know your chronotype - your body's preferred time for waking, sleeping, activity and rest?

Can your body clock make you less productive at work?


Every hour spent sitting increases the risk of dying by heart disease as much as 18 per cent… even if you exercise regularly.

How office work can kill you